Okinawan Flat Belly Tonic

Okinawa Flat Belly Tonic is yet another scam weight loss product made up of a random grab-bag of vitamins, minerals, and powders. A message appeared in my email in-box with the subject line “bulging belly”. It turned out to be an advertisement for another way to supposedly lose weight without diet or exercise, the Okinawa

Another in a Pattern of Really Stupid Marketing Videos, This One Claiming Tinnitus Has Nothing to Do with the Ear and Is 100% Curable.

Is that ringing not in your ears? Can it be cured? Recently I have written about several really stupid marketing videos for dietary supplements e.g. here. They suck you in by promising to reveal a secret, but you have to watch the entire video to learn the secret. One says “5 minutes” but lasts half an

Lose Weight without Diet or Exercise? Where’s the Proof?

Can obese people lose weight without diet or exercise, by just taking this pill? Yeah, sure! Pull the other one! I’ve been getting emails with “Confirmation numbers” in the Subject Line, numbers like 711, 526, 95311. One even says “Your order is pending”. The numbers don’t confirm anything; they are just click-bait to get you

Rightful for Pain: Deceptive Advertising and a Dangerous Ingredient

Rightful is an herbal supplement mixture offering pain relief and much more. Its claims are deceptive and not backed by good science. Not only that, but one of its ingredients is contraindicated. Would you rather choose a pain remedy based on art or science? How are mixtures of herbal remedies chosen?Rightful is a mixture of

Stupid Videos Meet Penis Growth Scams

There is a pattern of stupid, misleading videos promoting dietary supplements. This video discloses a secret African ritual for penis enlargement; the “ritual” consists of taking a pill with 14 natural ingredients. The claims are too silly to take seriously. Earlier this month I wrote about a pattern I had noticed in advertising for dietary supplements: deceptive

‘Clinically Tested’—What Does That Mean?

They used to call useless treatments “snake oil.” We don’t hear that term anymore; now they may be called “dietary supplements” or “natural remedies.” A dietary supplement may contain a single herb or a combination of several ingredients. The ads frequently say they have been “clinically tested” or “clinically proven.” Do you believe that? I

A Pattern of Deceptive Video Ads for Supplements

I’ve been seeing a pattern of deceptive videos that promise to reveal a secret but make you watch the entire video to learn what it is. They feature alarmist stories, emotional language, and testimonials, but no actual science. They make claims that can’t be believed. Glasses are an effective remedy for decreased vision, not a

Salonpas

Salonpas is an over-the-counter topical NSAID used to treat pain. It’s probably safe and might be worth trying for minor pain, but the effect is small and the advertising is more hype than substance. Do you get annoyed when the media keep repeating the same commercials? I do. And recently I’ve been particularly annoyed by

Melatonin

Melatonin supplements are increasingly popular, but the evidence is weak and mixed. Will taking a melatonin supplement put you to sleep?I don’t understand how Facebook’s algorithms work; but I wonder if they have gotten the false impression that I suffer from insomnia, since I have recently been bombarded with information about a multitude of natural

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