Lumen’s Information Is Not So Illuminating

Lumen is a handheld device that you can supposedly use to “hack your metabolism”. The science behind it is not convincing. Users are essentially navel-gazing. An introductory video on the website for Lumen presents it as the first device for hacking your metabolism. They make a lot of claims that have not been substantiated by

Energy Medicine Pain Relief Patches Are Laughable Quackery

There’s no acceptable scientific evidence that these patches work to relieve pain. The advertising features pseudoscientific energy medicine gibberish. Good for a laugh, but not to be believed. This book is titled “Energy Medicine: The Scientific Basis. But there is no scientific basis. Recently I have seen numerous ads for patches that can be applied

Blue Light

Blue light blocking glasses and other products that block blue light promise to improve eye health along with many other questionable claims. The evidence is lacking. Blue light is part of the spectrum of sunlight. Other sources include digital screens (TVs, computers, laptops, smart phones and tablets), electronic devices, and fluorescent and LED lighting. We

Taopatch Offers Everything… Except Science

Taopatch promises all kinds of vague benefits, but the mechanism of action is implausible and what they call scientific proof is no such thing. It promises to improve your health and wellness. Who wouldn’t want that? Immediate health benefits. Why wait for things that work slowly?  Delivery via skin patch: no pills, no surgery, no

Visual Stress

The Opticalm Clinic claims to diagnose and treat visual stress with colored lenses and other aids. Visual stress is a poorly defined, questionable condition and Opticalm’s claims are not backed by scientific evidence. What does “visual stress” mean? It appears to be a new term for what has also been called Irlen syndrome (described by Steve Novella

BioCharger’s Claims Are Too Silly to Take Seriously

The BioCharger is a subtle energy device based on fantasy, not science. At $15,000, pretty expensive for a placebo. Facebook keeps sending me a puzzling picture. It shows clothed adults sitting around (but not touching) a futuristic-looking apparatus: a glass cylinder with tubes and flashing lights visible inside. They apparently believe something is being transmitted

Nurse Practitioner Pushes Dubious Aesthetic Treatments

Nurse practitioner aggressively advertises a plethora of aesthetic treatments, some of which are dubious. It’s legal, but is it ethical? Facelifts by plastic surgeon improve appearance. Aesthetic nurse practitioner’s offerings are more dubious. Larson Medical Aesthetics, an organization with three locations, is run by a nurse practitioner named Margaret Larson. It is being promoted through

Scroll to top